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Strategic Living Seattle

Step 3 of Five Steps to Take When Walking Home Alone

Step 3 of Five Steps to Take When Walking Home Alone

Step 3 of Five Steps to Take When Walking Home Alone

How aware are you?
There are several types of awareness. You’ve surely heard that you have to be aware
of your surroundings. Very true. But you also have to be aware of your interior
environment. And your social environment. And your media environment. Whew!

Step #3: Recognize When You’re Most Vulnerable.
Looking back, I wondered why I was able to peg just another
pedestrian as a potential threat. I’ve since learned how much
our moods play into what we see and how we interpret events. At
that time I wasn’t worried or preoccupied. Other than that
infamous cigarette, I had no alcohol or drugs in my system. I
was young and healthy. I realize I was fully present in that
moment.
Most of us know that drugs and alcohol impair our driving, and
our judgment. But we don’t realize how much our mood
influences our response to situations. When we’re feeling
down, negative self-talk kicks in.
Today I tell my clients:
(1) Recognize that you’re vulnerable when you’re under the influence of
drugs and alcohol. drive. Excessive consumption of alcohol or drugs are involved
in the vast majority of acquaintance rapes.
(2)
Some prescription medications negatively affect your mental state and
energy level. You may appear more vulnerable to a potential perp
looking for prey.
(3) Attend big house parties with friends. Stay together. Leave together.
Keep an eye out for each other. Have a designated “sober
person” if at all possible, someone who’s earned your trust
and who can keep your interests in mind. Isolation, both
physical and social, are key conditions for assault.
(4) Feeling sad, depressed, or angry can impair judgment just as
a drug does. And potential perps will exploit those moods, or try to
push your buttons to evoke reactions they can then exploit.
(5) Self-care is a crucial aspect of self-defense.
Most importantly, assault is always the fault of the assailant. Every one of us
occasionally are not at our best and most alert. The decision to commit assault
comes solely from the assailant.
Point to Ponder: Think back on the last time you were sad,
depressed or angry. How did you deal with it? Did you do
anything to lift your mood, and was it successful? Did you feel
good about your remedy the next day? Plan for ameliorating a bad
mood that you’ll feel positive about later. This is worth
repeating, over and over again: self-care is a crucial aspect
But wait, there’s more.
Become informed of various ploys and manipulations used by those
who want to target YOU.
It is now easier than ever to spread information, as well as
misinformation. Sadly, a few people feel powerful when they
spread fear and confusion.
So you’ll hear stories about syringes in gas pump handles,
poisoned Halloween candy and bad guys who target women wearing
pony tails. All false!
Many of those stories are “urban legends.” They never happen
but a lot of people think they did.
Today, I tell my clients that misinformation plays on fears. We
end up wasting time and energy – like preparing for a
hurricane in Seattle rather than an earthquake. We set up
defenses against non-issues, so we get distracted from real
threats.
Point to Ponder: When was the last time you heard a scary “true”
story? Reading between the lines, were you getting a first-hand
report or a friend-of-a-friend tall tale?
web pages and to get a list of
accurate sources of information.

Joanne Factor
Strategic Living

Step #3: Recognize When You’re Most Vulnerable. Looking back, I wondered why I was able to peg just another pedestrian as a potential threat. I’ve since learned how much our moods play into what we see and how we interpret events. At that time I wasn’t worried or preoccupied. Other than that infamous cigarette, I had no alcohol or drugs in my system. I was young and healthy. I realize I was fully present in that moment. Most of us know that drugs and alcohol impair our driving, and our judgment. But we don’t realize how much our mood influences our response to situations. When we’re feeling down, negative self-talk kicks in. Today I tell my clients:
drugs and alcohol. drive.  Excessive consumption of alcohol or drugs are involved in the vast majority of acquaintance rapes.(2)
energy level.  You may appear more vulnerable to a potential perp
looking for prey. (3) Attend big house parties with friends. Stay together. Leave together. Keep an eye out for each other. Have a designated “sober person” if at all possible, someone who’s earned your trust and who can keep your interests in mind. Isolation, both physical and social, are key conditions for assault. (4) Feeling sad, depressed, or angry can impair judgment just as a drug does. And potential perps will exploit those moods, or try to push your buttons to evoke reactions they can then exploit. (5) Self-care is a crucial aspect of self-defense.Most importantly, assault is always the fault of the assailant.  Every one of us occasionally are not at our best and most alert.  The decision to commit assault comes solely from the assailant. Point to Ponder: Think back on the last time you were sad, depressed or angry. How did you deal with it? Did you do anything to lift your mood, and was it successful? Did you feel good about your remedy the next day? Plan for ameliorating a bad mood that you’ll feel positive about later. This is worth repeating, over and over again: self-care is a crucial aspect of self-defense.But wait, there’s more.Become informed of various ploys and manipulations used by those who want to target YOU. It is now easier than ever to spread information, as well as misinformation. Sadly, a few people feel powerful when they spread fear and confusion. So you’ll hear stories about syringes in gas pump handles, poisoned Halloween candy and bad guys who target women wearing pony tails. All false! Many of those stories are “urban legends.” They never happen but a lot of people think they did. Today, I tell my clients that misinformation plays on fears. We end up wasting time and energy – like preparing for a hurricane in Seattle rather than an earthquake. We set up defenses against non-issues, so we get distracted from real threats. Point to Ponder: When was the last time you heard a scary “true” story? Reading between the lines, were you getting a first-hand report or a friend-of-a-friend tall tale? Visit my Resources and News web pages and  to get a list of accurate sources of information. 
Joanne Factor Strategic Living

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