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Starfish Therapies San Francisco

News from Starfish Therapies

News from Starfish Therapies

News from Starfish Therapies

Happy New Year!

January 2011

Volume 26

In This Issue

Updates
Out and About
Just For Fun
Carry Your Child Safely
Terminology

Starfish Updates
Blog: Check out our most recent blog posts!

– Disabled Sports USA Far West. This group has multiple options for people of all
abilities to get involved with activities such as skiing and rafting.

Quick Links…
Now that Winter is here there are great options for exploring the snow. In the
for people of all abilities. There are also multiple resorts with all sorts of
snow activities including sledding and tubing if skiing and snowboarding aren’t
for you. If that much activity doesn’t suit you the Your Therapy Source has some
that stimulate the sensory system as well as the imagination!
Continuing the snow theme, you can have fun with your kids by making snowflakes
Its a great introduction to scissors or a great way to work on fine motor control.
It will also bring in imagination and creativity if you want to decorate the house
for a snowfall!
this month!

How to Carry Your Child Safely: Protect Yourself!

When caring for your child, you are most likely focused on his/her safety. Thus,
caregivers often forget to ensure the proper body mechanics needed to keep themselvessafe.
Parents should remind themselves, however, that their health and safety are of utmost
importance in maintaining their child’s well-being.

Caring for your child puts increased stress on your back, which may result in back
pain or injuries. When your child is an infant, you may be lifting approximately
7 to 10 pounds about 50 times per day. By the time your child is 3, this number
increases to about 25 to 30 pounds. Given the increased load and repetitive lifting,
caregivers are at a great risk for injury if they do not use the proper body mechanics.

So, here are a few tips to keep in mind when you are carrying for your child to
make sure you are keeping your body safe.

1. Avoid stretching your arms out to reach for your child. Instead, always get as
close as possible to your child before you try to pick him up.
2. When picking your child up from the floor or a low surface, lift by bending at
your knees in a squat position, rather than bending at your back.
3. When changing your child, do not lean over the surface area. You should adjust
the work surface so that she is at the level of your navel.
4. When feeding your child, keep both your and your child’s faces at even levels
to prevent you from slouching over. When you are putting your child in or removing
your child from a high chair, always take off the high chair tray.
5. When putting your child in or taking him out of a crib, always put the side of
the crib down so you do not have to bend over it.
6. When transferring your child into a bathtub, sit on the edge of the bathtub with
one foot outside of the tub and one foot inside the tub.

For more information on tips to keep yourself safe when caring for your child, please

Terminology: Righting…

We know that sometimes the words used in your child’s therapy reports don’t always
make sense. Hopefully this will help you to understand what your therapist means
when they talk about righting reactions.

Righting is the movement between body segments in relation to each other and the
environment. It occurs as the body moves and changes it’s relationship with gravity.
We all use righting reactions throughout the day during activities such as rolling
over in bed, changing directions when walking and standing up. Righting reactions
are an element of balance. There are two main types of righting: head and trunk.

Head Righting: this refers to the movement of the head to vertical as the trunk
is displaced from the vertical position. You may see your therapist test this by
tilting your child forwards, backwards, and to either side. The goal is to see
if your child can maintain a vertical position of their head so they continue to
have a functional view of their environment.

Trunk Righting: this occurs when the trunk moves in relation to a change in base
of support. All position changes and weight shifts require adjustments of the muscles
between the shoulders and the pelvis, otherwise known as the trunk. Therefore,
when you change your base of support by standing on one foot, shifting your weight
in sitting to reach, or rolling from your side to your back, your trunk must adjust
to maintain the new base of support.

Head and trunk righting develop naturally in infants. However, in the presence
of neuromuscular or musculoskeletal impairments these righting reactions may not
occur naturally and may need to be trained with exercises. Impaired righting reactions
can effect all areas of development so it is important to identify and address as
necessary. Consult with your therapist if you have concerns.

Sincerely,

Your Friends at
Starfish Therapies
Volume 26  In This Issue UpdatesOut and AboutJust For FunCarry Your Child SafelyTerminology

Blog:  Check out our most recent blog posts!
Gross Motor Development vs Fine Motor DevelopmentTop 10 Blog Posts of 2010Pretend Climbing Giving Back:  This month our donation is going to DSUSAFW – Disabled Sports USA Far West.  This group has multiple options for people of all abilities to get involved with activities such as skiing and rafting.
Our Website
Facebook
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Now that Winter is here there are great options for exploring the snow.  In the Tahoe area there is adaptive skiing for people of all abilities.  There are also multiple resorts with all sorts of snow activities including sledding and tubing if skiing and snowboarding aren’t for you.  If that much activity doesn’t suit you the Your Therapy Source has some great ideas for fun snow activities that stimulate the sensory system as well as the imagination!
When caring for your child, you are most likely focused on his/her safety.  Thus, caregivers often forget to ensure the proper body mechanics needed to keep themselves safe. Parents should remind themselves, however, that their health and safety are of utmost importance in maintaining their child’s well-being.
Caring for your child puts increased stress on your back, which may result in back pain or injuries.  When your child is an infant, you may be lifting approximately 7 to 10 pounds about 50 times per day.  By the time your child is 3, this number increases to about 25 to 30 pounds.  Given the increased load and repetitive lifting, caregivers are at a great risk for injury if they do not use the proper body mechanics.
So, here are a few tips to keep in mind when you are carrying for your child to make sure you are keeping your body safe.
Avoid stretching your arms out to reach for your child.  Instead, always get as close as possible to your child before you try to pick him up.When picking your child up from the floor or a low surface, lift by bending at your knees in a squat position, rather than bending at your back.When changing your child, do not lean over the surface area.  You should adjust the work surface so that she is at the level of your navel. When feeding your child, keep both your and your child’s faces at even levels to prevent you from slouching over. When you are putting your child in or removing your child from a high chair, always take off the high chair tray.When putting your child in or taking him out of a crib, always put the side of the crib down so you do not have to bend over it.When transferring your child into a bathtub, sit on the edge of the bathtub with one foot outside of the tub and one foot inside the tub. For more information on tips to keep yourself safe when caring for your child, please click  here and here..
We know that sometimes the words used in your child’s therapy reports don’t always make sense.  Hopefully this will help you to understand what your therapist means when they talk about righting reactions.
Righting is the movement between body segments in relation to each other and the environment. It occurs as the body moves and changes it’s relationship with gravity.  We all use righting reactions throughout the day during activities such as rolling over in bed, changing directions when walking and standing up. Righting reactions are an element of balance. There are two main types of righting: head and trunk.
Head Righting: this refers to the movement of the head to vertical as the trunk is displaced from the vertical position. You may see your therapist test this by tilting your child forwards, backwards, and to either side.  The goal is to see if your child can maintain a vertical position of their head so they continue to have a functional view of their environment.
Trunk Righting: this occurs when the trunk moves in relation to a change in base of support. All position changes and weight shifts require adjustments of the muscles between the shoulders and the pelvis, otherwise known as the trunk.  Therefore, when you change your base of support by standing on one foot, shifting your weight in sitting to reach, or rolling from your side to your back, your trunk must adjust to maintain the new base of support.
Head and trunk righting develop naturally in infants.  However, in the presence of neuromuscular or musculoskeletal impairments these righting reactions may not occur naturally and may need to be trained with exercises.  Impaired righting reactions can effect all areas of development so it is important to identify and address as necessary.  Consult with your therapist if you have concerns.
Thank you for reading this month.  We always appreciate your support.  See you next month! 

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